The History of the Hungarian Bus Manufacturers’ Cluster

The idea to strengthen cooperation amongst Hungarian-based businesses participating in the domestic bus industry in order to facilitate recovery from the financial crisis in an organized manner was formulated in the summer of 2009. The main objective of the programme is to provide input for the development of the Hungarian automotive industry so that domestic bus transportation companies’ rehabilitation needs are satisfied by buses manufactured in Hungary.

This idea, proposed at a conference for experts on buses held in Győr, Hungary in the summer of 2009, took shape as a result of several months of work. From that point on, companies confident that this form of cooperation would be effective had the following opportunity: through joint development and the involvement of domestic suppliers, to create a competitive range of domestic bus models and types for which they would receive steady orders not only from domestic public bus transportation companies (VOLÁN companies), but also from increasing foreign customers that still believe in Hungarian bus production.

This programme was aimed at strengthening Hungarian bus manufacturing and related supply industries as well as enhancing and improving their job retention potential. Reinvigorating the knowledge base that still exists in Hungary for bus manufacturing, promoting cooperation amongst active bus manufacturers and their suppliers, creating the highest possible added value in Hungary and strengthening these businesses are our key priorities.
It is quite clear that the Hungarian bus industry has the capacity, infrastructural resources and bus models that, in addition to meeting domestic demands, could as well be used for export production.

In April 2010, 30 Hungarian-based companies established the Hungarian Bus Manufacturers’ Cluster for the Bus Rehabilitation Programme initiative with the support of the Budapest University of Technology and Economics’ Vehicle Production Department.

Founding Members:

  1. AUTO UNIVERZÁL KFT.
  2. AUTO-RAD CONTROLLE KFT.
  3. CAR-INSIDE KFT.
  4. CSABA-METÁL ZRT.
  5. I-CELL KFT.
  6. IKARUSBUS KFT.
  7. IK FÉMTECHNIKA KFT.
  8. IK JÁRMŰTECHNIKA KFT.
  9. JÁFI-AUTOKUT KFT.
  10. KÖZLEKEDÉSTUDOMÁNYI INTÉZET NONPROFIT KFT.
  11. LIBERATUS KFT.
  12. LINCZ KFT.
  13. MACHER KFT.
  14. MAGYAR AUTÓBUSZGYÁRTÓ KFT.
  15. MERITUM KFT.
  16. METAL 99 KFT.
  17. METAL HOLDING ZRT.
  18. NATUREN KFT.
  19. NOR-SERVICE KFT.
  20. OMNEX KFT.
  21. OROSHÁZAGLAS KFT.
  22. PRO-FORM KFT.
  23. RÁBA JÁRMŰ KFT.
  24. SILEX KFT.
  25. TITÁN 94 KFT.
  26. TREZOR-LIKTOR ZRT.
  27. TÜV NORD-KTI KFT.
  28. VARIENS KFT.
  29. VILL-CAD KKT.
  30. VULTRON KFT.

Supporting Member:

31. BUDAPESTI  MŰSZAKI ÉS GAZDASÁGTUDOMÁNYI EGYETEM
JÁRMŰGYÁRTÁS ÉS -JAVÍTÁS TANSZÉK

Companies that joined the Cluster in November of 2010:

32. GANZ TRANSELEKTRO KÖZLEKEDÉSI BERENDEZÉSEKET GYÁRTÓ KFT.
33. HÉFAL KFT.
34. IMMONTAGE KFT. (TÁMOGATÓ TAG)
35. INTECHSYS KFT.
36. KNORR-BREMSE KFT.
37. G&T PROGRESS KFT.
38. BUSZ I KFT.
39. KÖNIG KFT.

What Is a Cluster?

The Directorate-General for Enterprise and Industry of the European Commission defines a cluster as: “…a group of interdependent firms and related institutions that are collaborators and competitors, geographically concentrated in one or more regions, interested in a specific area/sector, linked by common technologies and skills, and are science-based or traditional.” (1)

Accordingly, a cluster is a group of companies and related economic operators and institutions cooperating in a particular economic area that are geographically located close to each other. Members use a relatively high proportion of each other’s products and services, rely on the same knowledge base and infrastructure, utilize similar innovation bases, and also compete with each other while retaining their economic sovereignty. The “critical mass” is an essential factor in setting up a cluster, i.e. only a sufficient number of companies with an appropriate knowledge base can establish an efficiently operating cluster. Network cooperation also provides member businesses an opportunity to decrease their costs in areas where it is made possible by common solutions. Bottom-up initiatives are typical features of clustering, i.e. clusters are always established by the voluntary pooling of interested businesses.

[1] Source: http://www.polusprogram.eu/hu/fogalomtar